PART 5: The Moodmetric measurement and preventive occupational health care

Stress is a good thing, it is a driving force keeping us active and productive. However, excessive strain can lead to overload, especially when the issues causing stress are beyond our control. Chronic stress is a state where stress outweighs recovery. The autonomic nervous system is off balance and the body is continuously in a state of alarm.

There is a clear link between chronic stress and several physical and psychological illnesses. Stress is often the underlying reason for burnout. Overload is difficult to recognize because it builds up over a long period of time. Stress, the feeling of not being able to cope, can still be a taboo, resulting in people seeking help too late. According to research, even 60-80% of visits to the doctor have a connection with stress (Nerurkar et al. 2013). Every fourth employee suffers from work-related stress at some point of their working life.

In this fifth part of our article series we discuss the Moodmetric measurement benefits at preventive occupational health care.

Electrodermal activity and stress

The Moodmetric smart ring is one of the first devices on the market to measure easily and reliably long-term stress by interpreting the phenomenon of electrodermal activity. This physiological measurement can accurately tell about the fluctuating stress levels of an individual in everyday life. Electrodermal activity is especially sensitive to changes in emotional and cognitive stress and being able to measure it accurately in a particular context tells us what causes stress and why. This makes the Moodmetric smart ring a great tool for managing stress, especially for knowledge workers.

The Moodmetric smart ring is easy to use and the measurement results can be observed in real time on a mobile app. For a good overview, it is recommended that the ring is worn for at least a period of two weeks, but using the ring and its data can be well incorporated into everyday life, for as long as it is needed. In two weeks, however, the user learns about their individual sources of stress and recovery, and gains motivation to seek a better balance between the two.

The Moodmetric measurement is real-time, informative and accurate, with the ring being easy and comfortable to use. The data is represented in visual form on a mobile app and the real-time view enables immediate actions. This is very important when aiming for behavioral changes. Corrective actions can be applied into practice right away.

According to customer feedback, the data accumulated by the Moodmetric smart ring helps to better recognize individual sources of stress and recovery and motivates one to take concrete actions.

Moodmetric provides new services for preventive occupational health care

The Moodmetric reseach and development has been strongly guided by our customer feedback. Customer comments and use cases have been collected since 2015. Especially our corporate customers have repeatedly expressed their wish to have the Moodmetric services available at occupational health care. Individuals often look forward to receiving professional help in interpreting the data, along with gaining a better understanding of good practices in managing their stress.

Occupational health care has a limited selection of tools to offer customers seeking help in managing their stress overload, or whose health issues are clearly stress related. Most customers at occupational health care might just need a guiding hand and not long-term consultancy, but they would still like to have aids such as Moodmetric at their disposal if needed. It is in the interest of insurance companies too to see a more varied selection of preventive healthcare solutions being introduced and available for patients.

Well-being technology can motivate individuals to take an active role in enhancing their own health. The Moodmetric mission is to prevent health issues and related costs caused by stress, all the way from individuals to businesses and communities alike.

Read more about Cost of work related stress at our article published at HIMSS Europe conference site in June 2019.

Sources:

Nerurkar, A., Bitton, A., Davis, R. B., Phillips, R. S., & Yeh, G. (2013). When physicians counsel about stress: Results of a national study. JAMA internal medicine, 173(1), 76-77.

Koskinen, S., Lundqvist, A., & Ristiluoma, N. (2012). Terveys, toimintakyky ja hyvinvointi Suomessa 2011. The Finnish institute of Health and Wellbeing , Report: 2012_068.

Picture: Pixabay

The complete set of 5 articles explains the Moodmetric measurement, science behind and the applications:

  1. Part 1: Fight or flight response
  2. Part 2: Chronic stress – The brain concludes that we are continuously in danger
  3. Part 3: Tools for long term and continuous stress measurement
  4. Part 4: The Moodmetric ring stress measurement and understanding the data
  5. Part 5: The Moodmetric measurement in preventive occupational health