Moodmetric data analytics tool

The Moodmetric data analytics tool is created to support research and development projects related to EDA (electrodermal activity) measurements.

The tool enables researchers and developers to quickly process and visualize large Moodmetric data sets in uniform manner. It generates both group and individual level reports based on input data from wearable devices. The tool is released as open source for anyone to benefit of the Moodmetric measurement data in various use cases.

Download the Moodmetric data visualization tool instruction here.

For more information, contact
Jari Jussila
[email protected]
+358 40 717 8345

Assembling the Rings

Emotion load indication through electrodermal activity or skin conductance measurement is a rising trend in the modern wearable technology. Most manufacturers use the word stress as a synonym for emotional load.
Wearables are typically forced to use dry skin electrodes in varying conditions, with movement present. Ideally the system should be able to detect, interpret and visualize underlying electrodermal activity changes caused by autonomous nervous system reactions.
Typically the following challenges are present:
• Dry and sweaty hands produce autonomic responses with significantly different amplitudes
• Different people produce significantly different response amplitudes
• Analysis is subject to constant motion artifacts
The Moodmetric algorithm is developed to produce higher lever emotional information of the wearer, based on the raw conductivity signal received.

 

The first Moodmetric rings have been produced. The ring is improved version of the beta sample, that has been in user testing since October 2014. The electronics manufacturing and 3D-printing of the covers of the new version was made in August 2015. The stone assembly could now be completed:

 

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The two steel rings with an insulation in between is the actual sensor needed to detect the changes in skin conductivity. The ring comes in four sizes: US (6.5, 8, 10 and 12.5), EU (17, 18,5, 20 and 22 mm). It is exchangeable which enables several users to the same stone. This reduces cost but note: excessive swapping causes the snaps to wear out.

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The final product is small and lightweight. It connects with the Moodmetric app automatically and displays your emotional intensity real-time.

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The Smart Jewerly Designer

Vesa NilssonSilversmith and designer Vesa Nilsson shares his views about Moodmetric and the future of jewels.

www.ozjewel.com

What were your first thoughts when you heard of Moodmetric?

I thought it’s similar to the Mood Ring from the 70s! After seeing the first demo I realized that it has much more dimensions than that. The technology inside the ring, and the user interface was really convincing and got me really interested about the project.

Have you been interested in combining technology to jewerly before?

Tecnology in our daily lives has increased and it has brought challenges not only related to usability but also how wearable the tech actually is and what is the message it delivers. How do the equipment and gadgets modify our wardrobe and style? Do we want to look like cyborgs or hide the tech? The tech is coming to dressing, jewelry and fashion.

The tech is coming to dressing, jewelry and fashion

People have used jewerly for about 7000 years and reasons to wear them have changed over centuries. The common factor has always been a personal relationship to the jewel and especially memories associated with it. Today, if we want, the tech enables saving the memories and data very concretely. The jewel itself can measure our bodily functions and quality of sleep, it can store pictures and moments that can be shared with others.

For me as a designer it is extremely intriguing to have a possibility to make jewels that can protect us, improve our wellbeing and health, and add quality to our lives.

What were the main things to consider when you started working with the design?

My aim was to create a jewel without highlighting the technical function

The starting point for the Moodmetric Ring design was the technology inside: electronics assembly and conductive rings, and equally usability and manufacturability. My aim was to create a jewel without highlighting the technical function. The purpose was to make a ring that the wearer wants to use in her everyday life.

What was the most difficult constraint dictated by the tech part of the ring? How did you solve it?

It was very challenging to have the ring fitting to everyone: everyone´s fingers are of different size and shape, and the measurement is very exact requiring the contact to be constant. One-size-fits-all was out of the question, as well as very wide selection of sizes. But we came out well, with a good fitting and measurability for everyone.

How do you see the future of smart jewerly? How you think the technology will affect the jewerly market? Are there some other trends in jewelry market that are upcoming?

I strongly believe that jewelry will have more functions in the future, they will not remain just decorative items. They can be equipment that link to personal wellbeing, to relationships with others or to the health and medical systems.

In ancient times the jewelry often had mystic healing or protective powers related to them by folklore that are now here for real.

You are doing a thesis work at the moment, and Moodmetric is a part of it. Can you tell shortly what is it about?

The Moodmetric project lit up my interest on the topic: design, handicraft, technology and the possibilities coming from combining them in future jewerly. I have over 20 years of experience of silver/goldsmith work as well as a designer and a craftsman.

Jewels and other personal objects should reflect the thoughts of the user, not the designer

Designing jewels is very close to telling silent stories and describing emotions. A jewelry designer tries to give a form to something we think or feel or create in us emotions that we want to share. And which we want to wear! Designing jewels is and art form that does not forget usability, unlike industrially designed everyday objects where “form follows emotion”.

I compare designing jewels to composing music: when the result is successful it is like a good piece of music that becomes a part of our lives and raises emotions in us.

Having so many things around us today, the desirability of a product is defined by how it resonates with us, what story it tells to us. “Idea of craft” is more and more essential in designing products with other aspects than usability. Jewels and other personal objects should reflect the thoughts of the user, not the designer. What I will bring up in my thesis work is especially the idea of combining humanity and individuality to technology products. I want to add some “soul” to technology!

Moodmetric features: Scope and Wearing the ring

MoodScope curve

Scope tells about the instantaneous reactions of the wearer. When you feel something, your autonomous nervous system reacts and small changes can be measured from your skin.

The Moodmetric Ring detects the changes that can be followed online with the smartphone app. All the reactions cause an upward jump on the Scope, the bigger the emotion, the higher the curve goes. The physical response delay is 1.5 seconds, so the jump is visible 1.5 s after seeing a ghost… Continue reading “Moodmetric features: Scope and Wearing the ring”

What is moodtech? – Science behind Moodmetric

Moodmetric measures the electrodermal activity (EDA) of the skin, which is widely adopted in psychological research 1. EDA is generated by activity of the sweat glands.  Moodmetric measures the palmar skin on your finger. The palmar skin is the recommended EDA measurement location, since it has the highest sweat gland density2.

The unconscious actions of the human body are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. It consists of the sympathetic part and the parasympathetic part. The parasympathetic part controls the body’s rest-and-digest functions and the sympathetic part controls fight-or-flight reactions. When bodily functions are not of interest and the emotional side is, sympathetic nervous system is your choice.

The sweat glands are exclusively innervated by the sympathetic nervous system. This makes EDA an ideal measure for sympathetic activation.2 Electrodermal activity correlates to general emotional intensity, negative emotion, concern, and anxiety. 1, 3 These emotions cause almost similar electrodermal responses, which makes them very hard to differentiate. However, Moodmetric will tell you if certain parts of your day have brought up emotions or not. Inversely, Moodmetric tells you weather you are calm or not. This is particularly useful during your mindfulness, meditation and other calming exercises.

Mobile EDA devices have been used by scientists for some time2, 4, and now we bring this technology within everyone´s reach.

Signal accuracy

The signal accuracy has been proven in a study of 24 people by the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health by J. Torniainen et al.. The accuracy against a laboratory grade reference was found to be 83 %. They conclude:

“Clearly the ring sensor can be used to measure a valid EDA signal as indicated by the similarity of both event-related responses and the calculated features. The accuracy of the Moodmetric EDA Ring is adequate for psychological and physiological research when weighted against the advantage of conducting ecologically valid experiments outside laboratory conditions.”

The results have been accepted for publication in the 2015 conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2015, August 25-29).

Our measurement has been proven to be accurate also by University of Tampere, Finland. The correlation with the reference equipment Nexus-10-MK II was good. Comparison details in charts below.

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1 Mendes, W.B. (2009). Assessing the autonomic nervous system. In: Harmon-Jones   E. ja Beer J.S. Methods in social neuroscience. New York: Guilford Press. p. 118-147.

2 Setz C., Arnrich B., Schumm J. and La R. (2010) Discriminating Stress From Cognitive Load Using a Wearable EDA Device. IEEE Trans. Inf. Technol. Biomed. 14(2). p. 410-417.

3 Nikula R. (1991) Psychological correlates of nonspecific skin conductance responses. Psychophysiology. 28(1). p.86-90.

4 Poh M.Z, Swenson N.C. and Picard R.W. (2010) A Wearable Sensor for Unobtrusive, Long-Term Assessment of Electrodermal Activity. IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 57(4). p. 1243-1252.

 

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