PART 5: The Moodmetric measurement in preventive occupational health

Stress is a good thing, it is our driving force keeping us active and productive. However, excessive amounts of stress can lead to  overload, especially when the stress load is out of our hands. Chronic stress is a state where stress outweighs recovery. The autonomic nervous system is off balance and the body is continuously in alarm mode.

Chronic stress is in connection with several physical and psychological illnesses, and it is often behind burnout. Overload is difficult to recognize because it builds up over a long period of time.  Stress can also still be a taboo, and people seek help too late. According to research, even 60-80% of medical visits are in connection with stress (Nerurkar et al. 2013). Every fourth tells to suffer from work related stress at some point of their working life.

The Moodmetric measurement

The Moodmetric smart ring is one of the first devices to measure long term stress by interpreting the phenomenon of electrodermal activity / skin conductivity. This physiological measurement can accurately tell about fluctuating stress levels in daily life. Electrodermal activity measurement is especially sensitive to detect changes in emotional and cognitive stress. This makes the Moodmetric smart ring a great stress management tool especially for knowledge workers.

The Moodmetric smart ring is easy to use, and the measurement results can be observed real time on a smart phone screen. A minimum suggested measurement period is two weeks, but the measurement can go on for years when needed. In two weeks the user learns the individual sources of stress and recovery, and gains motivation to seek better balance.

The Moodmetric measurement is real-time, informative, accurate and the ring is comfortable to use also in long term.  The mobile app content is visual and the real time view enables immediate actions. This is very important when seeking behavior changes. Findings can be applied to practice right away.

According to customer feedback, the data collected by the Moodmetric smart ring helps to better recognize individual sources of stress and recovery, and motivates to take concrete actions.

Preventive occupational health is seeking to offer new services

The Moodmetricin reseach and development has been strongly guided by our customer feedback. Customer comments and use cases have been collected since 2015. Especially our corporate customers have repeatedly expressed their wish to have the Moodmetric services available at the occupational health. Individuals often look forward to receive professional help to measurement data interpretation, as well as to better understand good stress management practices.

The occupational health has a limited selection of tools to offer the customers that seek help to manage stress overload, or whose health issues are clearly stress related. Most occupational health customers might not need continuous stress measurement in long term, but they wish a measurement to be available as a service when needed and for as long as needed.

Wellbeing technology can motivate individuals to take an active role in enhancing own health. The Moodmetric mission is to prevent health issues and related costs caused by stress on an individual and community level. Preventive stress management is equally interesting to insurance companies in relevant fields.

Sources:

Nerurkar, A., Bitton, A., Davis, R. B., Phillips, R. S., & Yeh, G. (2013). When physicians counsel about stress: Results of a national study. JAMA internal medicine, 173(1), 76-77.

Koskinen, S., Lundqvist, A., & Ristiluoma, N. (2012). Terveys, toimintakyky ja hyvinvointi Suomessa 2011. The Finnish institute of Health and Wellbeing , Report: 2012_068.

Picture: Pixabay

The complete set of 5 articles:

  1. Part 1: Fight or flight response
  2. Part 2: Chronic stress – The brain concludes that we are continuously in danger
  3. Part 3: Tools for long term and continuous stress measurement
  4. Part 4: The Moodmetric ring stress measurement and understanding the data
  5. Part 5: The Moodmetric measurement in preventive occupational health