Moodmetric data analytics tool

The Moodmetric data analytics tool is created to support research and development projects related to EDA (electrodermal activity) measurements.

The tool enables researchers and developers to quickly process and visualize large Moodmetric data sets in uniform manner. It generates both group and individual level reports based on input data from wearable devices. The tool is released as open source for anyone to benefit of the Moodmetric measurement data in various use cases.

Download the Moodmetric data visualization tool instruction here.

For more information, contact
Jari Jussila
[email protected]
+358 40 717 8345

Diamonds are forever

Jewelry has always meant a lot for the mankind. Pendants, earrings and bands have had special powers from the early days of our existence.

Wearable technology has brought those features back to jewelry. They are not just decoration, they give the wearer something in addition. The Moodmetric ring protects the wearer – from excess stress! If not having mystic healing powers, it gives relevant information regarding your wellbeing.

The electronics inside Moodmetric has been miniatyrized so much, that important functions can be fitted inside a stone that is comparable to any festive ring. The original designer Vesa Nilsson has made the form that is sleek and attractive.

The functionality allows the top cover designed in a thousand ways. Moodmetric was happy to collaborate with another famous Helsinki based jewelry designer Tina Tillander, who was keen to combine precious stones with the original design.

How pretty they came out..

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Atelier Torbjörn Tillander – Tina Tillander

 

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Smaller and Smarter version now available

We are happy to inform that we have completed the design of a completely new version of the Moodmetric Ring! It has several improvements compared to the current beta, that was introduced at the end of 2014.

The beta version is fully functional and has been heavily tested for ten months. Both the ring and app have worked very well and according to all expectations.

We have received a lot of feedback, which mostly concern about aesthetics of the ring.  Size matters and we have continuously worked on getting the ring even smaller. The main factor is the performance of the electronics module, leading to what kind of battery it requires.

After a six month development process we have managed to significantly reduce the size of the module, hence the “stone” of the ring. This is a great achievement and we are proud to present a perfect example of an electronics miniaturisation project. After all, a reference device used in laboratories is size of a butter packet! In the picture below the Moodmetric ring on a very narrow finger:

 

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New features include an alternating current measurement, which prevents oxidation of the ring. Charging and low battery indication leds are added based on the test user feedback, and several other small adjustments have been made.

The Moodmetric app is free to download from the AppStore and works together with your ring immediately. It shows live emotion data always when you have the app open. The continuously updating Moodmetric number tells your emotional intensity level and is comparable among different users.

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The design and visual aspects are extremely important for us. However, we can not yet provide as many design variants as requested. We hope to be in a position to offer a selection of rings to fit the taste of both women and and men in the near future, and will let you know as soon as we have news about this.

We will produce an initial batch of the new, smaller version of the Moodmetric ring in just a couple of weeks.

Please contact us at [email protected] to order one of the first samples.

See here how the rings were manufactured http://www.moodmetric.com/assembling-the-rings/

 

The Smart Jewerly Designer

Vesa NilssonSilversmith and designer Vesa Nilsson shares his views about Moodmetric and the future of jewels.

www.ozjewel.com

What were your first thoughts when you heard of Moodmetric?

I thought it’s similar to the Mood Ring from the 70s! After seeing the first demo I realized that it has much more dimensions than that. The technology inside the ring, and the user interface was really convincing and got me really interested about the project.

Have you been interested in combining technology to jewerly before?

Tecnology in our daily lives has increased and it has brought challenges not only related to usability but also how wearable the tech actually is and what is the message it delivers. How do the equipment and gadgets modify our wardrobe and style? Do we want to look like cyborgs or hide the tech? The tech is coming to dressing, jewelry and fashion.

The tech is coming to dressing, jewelry and fashion

People have used jewerly for about 7000 years and reasons to wear them have changed over centuries. The common factor has always been a personal relationship to the jewel and especially memories associated with it. Today, if we want, the tech enables saving the memories and data very concretely. The jewel itself can measure our bodily functions and quality of sleep, it can store pictures and moments that can be shared with others.

For me as a designer it is extremely intriguing to have a possibility to make jewels that can protect us, improve our wellbeing and health, and add quality to our lives.

What were the main things to consider when you started working with the design?

My aim was to create a jewel without highlighting the technical function

The starting point for the Moodmetric Ring design was the technology inside: electronics assembly and conductive rings, and equally usability and manufacturability. My aim was to create a jewel without highlighting the technical function. The purpose was to make a ring that the wearer wants to use in her everyday life.

What was the most difficult constraint dictated by the tech part of the ring? How did you solve it?

It was very challenging to have the ring fitting to everyone: everyone´s fingers are of different size and shape, and the measurement is very exact requiring the contact to be constant. One-size-fits-all was out of the question, as well as very wide selection of sizes. But we came out well, with a good fitting and measurability for everyone.

How do you see the future of smart jewerly? How you think the technology will affect the jewerly market? Are there some other trends in jewelry market that are upcoming?

I strongly believe that jewelry will have more functions in the future, they will not remain just decorative items. They can be equipment that link to personal wellbeing, to relationships with others or to the health and medical systems.

In ancient times the jewelry often had mystic healing or protective powers related to them by folklore that are now here for real.

You are doing a thesis work at the moment, and Moodmetric is a part of it. Can you tell shortly what is it about?

The Moodmetric project lit up my interest on the topic: design, handicraft, technology and the possibilities coming from combining them in future jewerly. I have over 20 years of experience of silver/goldsmith work as well as a designer and a craftsman.

Jewels and other personal objects should reflect the thoughts of the user, not the designer

Designing jewels is very close to telling silent stories and describing emotions. A jewelry designer tries to give a form to something we think or feel or create in us emotions that we want to share. And which we want to wear! Designing jewels is and art form that does not forget usability, unlike industrially designed everyday objects where “form follows emotion”.

I compare designing jewels to composing music: when the result is successful it is like a good piece of music that becomes a part of our lives and raises emotions in us.

Having so many things around us today, the desirability of a product is defined by how it resonates with us, what story it tells to us. “Idea of craft” is more and more essential in designing products with other aspects than usability. Jewels and other personal objects should reflect the thoughts of the user, not the designer. What I will bring up in my thesis work is especially the idea of combining humanity and individuality to technology products. I want to add some “soul” to technology!

The Story of Moodmetric

Our inventor Henry Rimminen, Ph.D., came up with the idea of implementing the standard electrodermal activity measurement with a ring in 2011.

The measurement technique itself was widely known but had mainly been in use in laboratories and universities. Consumer versions had been either bulky or not optimized to give meaningful data in a clear format.

Our dream was to provide everyone access to reliable emotion data. From the beginning we wanted to make a beautiful ring to wear in everyday life. It was also important for us that for the first time a wearable would show live emotion data in an easy-to-interpret way. Additionally we wanted to provide a simple yet accurate tool for stress measurement.

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Henry´s development work started with a fun prototype and PC software. The first experiments started with a ring wired to a circuit board made of wood.

For the first wireless prototype, the electronics were stuffed in a party ring with lots of glue. These electronics still work today — it’s the device with a cord in the picture.

Soon after, Henry made several 3D-printed “death star” models using a flexible ring. The ring’s flex structure was easy to damage, but the signal quality amazed everyone.

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The next development was a round model with a metallic ring. The ring part came in three sizes. It was quite heavy and spun easily, but was fully functional and very robust.

After a complete re-engineering of the PCB, Henry came up with the long and narrow model with a metal ring. It was very lightweight and fit the finger perfectly. There were contact issues with the steel chosen and battery life was low. However this prototype was the basis for the current commercial version.

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For the final ring we brought in a jewelry designer – Vesa Nilsson from OZ Jewel in Helsinki. The perfect shape of the Moodmetric ring was born thanks to him.

3D-printed models were used to verify proper ring attachment and finger fit. This beta version features long battery life and significantly faster charging than any of the earlier models. It is splash proof and people love it!