Boys’ poker night out

What does a Texas hold’em night look like in the eyes of the autonomic nervous system? That’s a question I decided to find out with my Moodmetric, since I was going anyway. Moodmetric is a ring that measures your autonomic responces through electrical skin conductance. Some of my friends seemed to think this was cheating, but I explained that this is in the name of “science”.

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This looks like a winning hand, let’s bet carefully

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Yes, a pair of nines in the hand can sometimes bring in some chips

The first game was all suffering. No cards to play with and my bluffs didn’t work at all. It seems that in a table of twelve guys, someone always has good cards, which results in confident betting. I ended up putting it all in and losing it a full hour before the heads up!

In the second game, half of the guys were more interested in the Eurovision song contest, and only five were left playing. Suits me. A won hand early in the game left me with a big stack, which gave me a free ride for the next hour. Careful betting and checking worked. To my surprise, I was left in the heads up after some reckless all-ins of my pals. The heads up worked out for me, but in all fairness, it could have turned out in both ways.

In the name of science, I recorded all of this with Moodmetric. See my game flower with comments below!

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My game flower in the Moodmetric App. Bigger radius means higher autonomic activation

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OMG two pairs takes it all!

Moodmetric Software Development Kit now available

Moodmetric now offers you the opportunity to include ring support in your own app. Emotional intensity tracking provides unique data to be used in applications only limited by imagination:

  • digital health

  • product marketing, product testing

  • music

  • entertainment

  • gaming

  • dating…

The data available for developers is based on the Moodmetric number, ranging from 0 to 100 and describing how strongly the wearer of the ring is feeling.

Moodmetric offers a beta license of our software development kit free of charge until release of the final licence. An interface is documented directly to the ring to make sure that you can run your application on any platform, as long as it supports Bluetooth 4.0. We provide full documentation for the interface and also example applications for iOS and Android. We also provide technical support to help you get going.

Some features in more detail (you will have the full description in the SDK package)

– The MM number notification tells if the person is very stressed or emotionally loaded. High MM notification is issued when MM number is elevated for over 5 minutes.
– The Relax notification tells if the person has successfully managed to relax for example in a meditation exercise. Relax notification is issued when MM number is low for over 5 minutes. This feature requires a ring with application version of 1.0.1 or above.
– The strong reaction notification tells if a strong emotional reaction has been detected at a certain moment. You can test responses e.g. to images and sounds.

Apply for a licence through the SDK form on our site/contacts or at [email protected]

 tools

What is moodtech? – Science behind Moodmetric

Moodmetric measures the electrodermal activity (EDA) of the skin, which is widely adopted in psychological research 1. EDA is generated by activity of the sweat glands.  Moodmetric measures the palmar skin on your finger. The palmar skin is the recommended EDA measurement location, since it has the highest sweat gland density2.

The unconscious actions of the human body are regulated by the autonomic nervous system. It consists of the sympathetic part and the parasympathetic part. The parasympathetic part controls the body’s rest-and-digest functions and the sympathetic part controls fight-or-flight reactions. When bodily functions are not of interest and the emotional side is, sympathetic nervous system is your choice.

The sweat glands are exclusively innervated by the sympathetic nervous system. This makes EDA an ideal measure for sympathetic activation.2 Electrodermal activity correlates to general emotional intensity, negative emotion, concern, and anxiety. 1, 3 These emotions cause almost similar electrodermal responses, which makes them very hard to differentiate. However, Moodmetric will tell you if certain parts of your day have brought up emotions or not. Inversely, Moodmetric tells you weather you are calm or not. This is particularly useful during your mindfulness, meditation and other calming exercises.

Mobile EDA devices have been used by scientists for some time2, 4, and now we bring this technology within everyone´s reach.

Signal accuracy

The signal accuracy has been proven in a study of 24 people by the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health by J. Torniainen et al.. The accuracy against a laboratory grade reference was found to be 83 %. They conclude:

“Clearly the ring sensor can be used to measure a valid EDA signal as indicated by the similarity of both event-related responses and the calculated features. The accuracy of the Moodmetric EDA Ring is adequate for psychological and physiological research when weighted against the advantage of conducting ecologically valid experiments outside laboratory conditions.”

The results have been accepted for publication in the 2015 conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2015, August 25-29).

Our measurement has been proven to be accurate also by University of Tampere, Finland. The correlation with the reference equipment Nexus-10-MK II was good. Comparison details in charts below.

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1 Mendes, W.B. (2009). Assessing the autonomic nervous system. In: Harmon-Jones   E. ja Beer J.S. Methods in social neuroscience. New York: Guilford Press. p. 118-147.

2 Setz C., Arnrich B., Schumm J. and La R. (2010) Discriminating Stress From Cognitive Load Using a Wearable EDA Device. IEEE Trans. Inf. Technol. Biomed. 14(2). p. 410-417.

3 Nikula R. (1991) Psychological correlates of nonspecific skin conductance responses. Psychophysiology. 28(1). p.86-90.

4 Poh M.Z, Swenson N.C. and Picard R.W. (2010) A Wearable Sensor for Unobtrusive, Long-Term Assessment of Electrodermal Activity. IEEE Trans. Biomed. Eng. 57(4). p. 1243-1252.

 

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